A few thoughts on Ryan Braun’s statement

By Nathan Petrashek

Ryan Braun’s long awaited statement on his suspension has finally arrived, and it’s a doozy.  Literally.   The most remarkable thing about the statement is that it took him 943 words to say what could have been said in 17:

  • He’s sorry.
  • He’ll never do it again.
  • He did it only that one time.
  • He’s really sorry.

At the end of the day, it probably doesn’t matter what Braun had to say.  He destroyed every shred of credibility he had with his victory speech, so I won’t hold it against anyone if they believe he started doping at the University of Miami, or whenever.  His story has a lot of loose threads.

And what is Braun’s story, you ask?  Hampered by a calf strain in the summer of 2011, Braun said simply that he used “a cream and a lozenge” to speed his recovery.  Of course, he failed his test in October, so that must have been some strain.  And we don’t know how Braun hooked up with Tony Bosch and Biogenesis in the first place, though that’s probably (hopefully?) of greater interest to MLB in its quest to rid the sport of PEDs than to Braun’s ever-dwindling fan base.

Braun explains his actions following his failed test as “self righteous” and stemming from his belief that he was “wronged and attacked.”  This part of the statement I take at face value.  I’m sure in the months following his positive test, he did convince himself that he was in the right.  That even though he brazenly flouted the Joint Drug Agreement, Dino Laurenzi’s decision to store his sample in a plastic tub in his basement for days was somehow so much worse.  I’m sure Braun rationalized, diminished, even denied his own drug use until, encouraged by the false confidence he had instilled in others, Braun somehow believed he stood on the moral high ground.

And so Braun’s most grievous sin is not his drug use, it’s his arrogance.  He believed he could beat a system in which he had been caught red-handed.  And he did, for a time, but not before smearing Laurenzi who, even if he didn’t exercise the best judgment in handling Braun’s sample, certainly didn’t deserve the inference of tampering Braun tried to create.  Notably, Braun did not say he had “privately expressed” his apologies to Laurenzi, as he did to MLB and Players’ Association officials.

Braun’s ego was the problem, and it may still be.  But he can’t dodge the cameras and questions forever.  And when they finally catch up to him, he’s going to wish a calf strain was his biggest worry.

The Failure of Bud Selig’s Logic

By Nathan Petrashek

Bud Selig has been on a whirlwind public relations tour over the All-Star break, but he just can’t seem to keep focused on the All-Star game.  Instead, everyone wants to know when the other shoe will drop in the Biogenesis investigation, a wide-ranging probe in the now-defunct anti-aging clinic that baseball believes supplied banned substances to some of the game’s brightest stars.

“This sport is cleaner than ever,” declared Selig at a POLITICO-sponsored breakfast interview.  It’s common to hear Selig speak of baseball’s drug agreement as the “toughest drug-testing program in America,” with harsh penalties and strict enforcement.

You have to wonder: if that were true, why is Biogenesis even a thing?

Keep in mind what baseball is desperately trying to do here.  They’ve doled out loads of money to consultants, private investigators, and drug peddlers in an effort to come up with something, anything, tying players to PEDs.  And there are apparently a lot of players caught up in this fishing expedition; if you believe media reports, anywhere between 20 and 100.  And though Selig has declined to say how many players might be suspended, he confirmed David Letterman’s hunch that a “day of reckoning” was on the horizon.  Those aren’t exactly words you use if you’re talking about a couple of fringe players.

And yet, as far as we know, not one of the players whose head is on the chopping block has actually failed a drug test.  Well, excluding Ryan Braun.  But even that test was thrown out because it was handled improperly – which is, by the way, evidence that the “toughest drug-testing program in America” really isn’t.

Is it really a clean sport if you have a huge segment of your playing population implicated in a drug scandal and yet can’t produce one positive test to corroborate circumstantial evidence of use?

Don’t believe what you hear about Ryan Braun

By Nathan Petrashek

Let me put this out there immediately: I have no idea whether Ryan Braun used performance-enhancing drugs.  It’s entirely possible that he did.  As much as we think we do, we (fans) don’t know who professional athletes really are.  While everything in Braun’s public persona suggests to me he didn’t, I simply don’t know.  And neither does anyone else except Ryan Braun.

That didn’t stop a ton of national reporters from generating clicks with misleading headlines.

Here’s one from SI’s Tom Verducci: “As Braun’s name surfaces in PED scandal, another sad day for sports”

The Miami Herald writes: “Braun releases statement on PED link to Miami-based clinic”

Even the Journal-Sentinel’s Tom Haudricourt gets in on the fun: “Ryan Braun attributes PED link to Research for 2011 drug appeal”

The problem: Recently discovered documents don’t link Ryan Braun to PEDs.

Let’s recap what we know.  Less than a week ago, the Miami New Times published a report linking some of baseball’s biggest names, including Alex Rodriguez, Nelson Cruz, and Melky Cabrera, with a Miami anti-aging clinic that also supposedly supplied performance-enhancing drugs.  The New Times obtained the records from an employee who worked at the clinic, Biogenesis, before it closed in December 2012.  The records contained numerous references to the University of Miami baseball team, including conditioning coach Jimmy Goins, which I said at the time spelled bad news for Braun after his successful appeal of a positive drug test in 2011.

It got much worse for Braun yesterday.  Yahoo’s Tim Brown and Jeff Passan found Braun’s name in the Biogensis records.  In some people’s minds, this meant an immediate link to PEDs and guilt.  Yet Brown and Passan specifically stated:

Three of the Biogenesis clinic records obtained by Yahoo! Sports show Braun’s name. Unlike the players named by the Miami New Times in its report that blew open the Biogenesis case, Braun’s name is not listed next to any specific PEDs.

Which is why the New Times didn’t report his name in the first place, incidentally.  In a blog post, the Mami New Times’ Chuck Strouse clarified:

Yahoo!’s story raises an obvious question. If Braun and Cervelli’s name appear in the Bosch records at the heart of New Times‘ investigation — and indeed, Yahoo!’s report does appear to match New Times records — why didn’t we report them in our first story?

Simple: An abundance of caution.

As Yahoo! notes, the records do not clearly associate either Braun, Cervelli or a third player who this morning denied all ties with Bosch (Orioles third baseman Danny Valencia) with use of supplements. Yahoo! apparently obtained copies of just these page of Bosch’s notebooks independently of New Times.

So what did the Biogenesis records reveal?  The Yahoo! story identifies three documents with Braun’s name:

1) A list that includes some players linked to PEDs (Rodriguez, Cabrera, and Cesar Carrillo) and some not (Francisco Cervelli and Danny Valencia).

2) A document which lists Braun’s name along with “RB 20-30k.”  A picture of this document was not included in the Yahoo! report.

3) A letter to an associate apparently congratulating Melky Cabrera on his MVP and referencing something called the “‘Braun’ advantage.”

Braun issued a plausible explanation after the story broke, claiming his attorneys consulted with Tony Bosch, a Biogenesis employee, while preparing for his successful appeal. Braun stated Bosch answered questions “about T/E ratio and possibilities of tampering with samples.”  According to Braun, there was a dispute over compensation for Bosch’s work, which was why Braun and his lawyer were listed under “moneys owed” and not on any other list.

This is at least consistent with the “RB 20-30k” notation and multiple references to one of Braun’s lawyers, Chris Lyons, later in the documents.  David Cornwell, another Braun attorney, released a statement saying he was introduced to Bosch early in Braun’s case and “found Bosch’s value to be negligible.”

While the reference to a “‘Braun’ advantage” is somewhat troubling, it amounts to nothing more than an obscure and ambiguous reference in a letter that could mean almost anything.  Nothing in the newest documents directly links Braun to PEDs or gives any more clarity to the circumstances surrounding Braun’s positive test in 2011 (for which I found Braun’s explanation last year wanting).

In short, we don’t know much more now than we did in 2011.  As with his statement last year, Braun’s most recent pronouncement almost raises more questions than answers.

So if you read anything proclaiming Braun definitively guilty or innocent, don’t believe it.  We just don’t know.