The Cards That Made Milwaukee Famous: 1909 T-206 Shad Barry

by Kevin Kimmes

Welcome to the 2nd installment of The Cards That Made Milwaukee Famous in which we try and shine the light of discovery on the players who were once household names in the Cream City. This series is dedicated to looking at Milwaukee’s baseball history through it’s cardboard representations: baseball cards.

Today we will continue on with the second of four players who played for the American Association Milwaukee Brewers in 1909 and appear in the T-206 card set. For more information on the American Association Brewers or the T-206 card set, click here.

From the author's personal collection.

From the author’s personal collection.

Shad Barry:

John C. “Shad” Barry (October 27, 1878 – November 27, 1936) was a regular in Milwaukee’s lineups from 1909 through 1910. Barry, who began his 10 year major league career at the age of 20 with the Washington Senators in 1899 would find himself playing at many different positions with many different teams during his major league tenure. Major league clubs that Barry played on include The Boston Beaneaters (1900-1901), The Philadelphia Phillies (1901-1904), The Chicago Cubs (1904-1905), The Cincinnati Reds (1905-1906), The St. Louis Cardinals (1906-1908) and the New York Giants (1908). (1)

In 1909, Barry would join the American Association Brewers for his first of two seasons in Milwaukee, hitting .235 as an outfielder. Barry would improve his hitting in his final year with the Brewers, recording a .252 average (3rd best on the team). (2)

Barry would leave the American Association for the Pacific Coast League in 1910, where he would see his batting average dive to a career low .193 with the Portland Beavers. He would remain in the minors for 2 more seasons, in 1912 as a player/coach for the Northwestern League’s Seattle Giants and in 1913 as a member of the New York State League’s Troy Trojans. (3)

Barry passed away at the age of 58 on November 27, 1936 in Los Angeles, CA.

Kevin Kimmes is a regular contributor to creamcitycables.com and an MLB Fan Cave Top 52 Finalist. You can follow him on Twitter at @kevinkimmes.

References:

(1) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shad_Barry

(2) Hamann, Rex & Koehler, Bob (2004) The American Association Milwaukee Brewers Charleston SC, Chicago IL, Portsmouth NH, San Francisco CA: Arcadia Publishing

(3) http://www.baseball-reference.com/minors/player.cgi?id=barry-002joh

The Cards That Made Milwaukee Famous: 1909 T-206 Dan McGann

by Kevin Kimmes

Ask your average 20/30-something Brewers’ fan about the history of Milwaukee baseball and they will probably mention the 1982 AL Champion Brewers, maybe even telling you something about the Braves once residing in County Stadium. Probe any further and you will find that the overall history of Milwaukee baseball becomes sort of a hazy, ghostly thing. A phantom past that seems to be lost in the dust of years gone by.

It’s a sad state of affairs when you consider that Milwaukee has been supporting professional baseball for over 100 years. This series will focus on the cardboard history of Milwaukee baseball, with an emphasis on Topps in years where multiple producers were making sets. By doing this, it’s my hope that I can help shine the light of discovery on the players who were once household names in the Cream City.

So, let’s start with Milwaukee’s earliest appearance on cardboard.

T-206 McGann BackT-206 (1909-1911):

Most famously known for containing among it’s 523 total cards what is commonly known as the “holy grail” of baseball cards, the T-206 Honus Wagner, this set contains 4 American Association Milwaukee Brewers among it’s subjects. These cards were an insert in 16 different brands of cigarettes and loose tobacco between 1909 and 1911. Each company emblazoned the backs of their cards with their own branding, leading to variants in many of the subjects. (1)

The American Association Milwaukee Brewers:

Established in 1902, this incarnation of Milwaukee Brewers called Athletic Park on the city’s near north side home. Later renamed Borchert Field (after owner Otto Borchert who died unexpectedly in 1927), the Brewers would play 51 seasons in Milwaukee, collecting championships in ’13, ’14, ’36, ’44, ’51 and ’52. The team would serve as a farm team for MLB franchises beginning in 1932, eventually becoming a Boston Braves minor league club in 1947 and paving the way for the Braves arrival in 1953.

The team’s history even includes the names of several baseball/sporting notables including on the field contributions from world famous Native American athlete Jim Thorpe (who led the league in stolen bases in 1916) and future MLB Hall-of-Famers Rogers Hornsby and George Sisler in 1928, and off the field contributions from managers Charlie Grimm and Casey Stengel. Even “The P.T. Barnum of baseball”, Bill Veeck, would ply his trade in Milwaukee, purchasing the franchise in 1941 and bringing with him promotional tactics the likes of which the city had never before seen.

For those seeking further information on the American Association Brewers, I suggest reading Rex Hamann and Bob Koehler’s The American Association Milwaukee Brewers (ISBN 978-0-7385-3275-2) as well as Baseball in Beertown: America’s Pastime in Milwaukee by Todd Mishler (ISBN 1-879483-94-7).

From the author's personal collection.

From the author’s personal collection.

Dan McGann:

Dennis Lawrence “Cap” McGann (July 15, 1871 – December 13, 1910) covered 1st base for Milwaukee from 1909 to 1910, the final 2 years of his professional baseball career. A former major leaguer, McGann began his professional career in the minors in 1895, but quickly advanced to the MLB’s Boston Beaneaters in 1896. He would also record time in the majors with the Baltimore Orioles in 1898, the Brooklyn Superbas and Washington Senators in 1899, St. Louis Cardinals from 1900 to 1901 and Baltimore Orioles 1902. He would eventually settle in with the New York Giants where he would play from 1902 through 1907 and become a World Series champion in 1905. His final stop in the majors would be in 1908 as a Boston Dove. (2)

Dennis would use his brothers name, Dan, for his 2 years of service to Milwaukee. In 160 appearances for Milwaukee in 1909, McGann would record 137 hits in 559 at-bats (.245 average). (3) While not spectacular by today’s standards, it should be noted that this was during what is commonly known as the “deadball era” during which batting averages as a whole were lower across the board.

McGann’s production would dip in his final season, recording just 117 hits in 520 at-bats (.225 average) across 151 games. On Tuesday December 13th, 1910 McGann was found dead in a Louisville hotel room, the victim of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound.

Kevin Kimmes is a regular contributor to creamcitycables.com and an MLB Fan Cave Top 52 Finalist. You can follow him on Twitter at @kevinkimmes.

Sources:

(1) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T206

(2) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dan_McGann

(3) http://www.baseball-reference.com/minors/player.cgi?id=mcgann001den

You Gotta Have Heart: What Being a Small Market Fan Means to Me

You gotta have heart, but a great mustache doesn’t hurt either.

by Kevin Kimmes

Yes, today’s title (well part of it) is taken from the musical “Damn Yankees”.

Already I can hear some of you saying, “A musical? That’s girl stuff!”, but in this case, oh how wrong you would be. See “Damn Yankees” is the story of a devoted Washington Senators fan named Joe Boyd who sells his soul to the devil so that the Senators can acquire a “long ball hitter” and finally beat the “damn Yankees”. It’s a story about unflinching devotion to your team even when you know that the outcomes will probably just break your heart.

Now replace Senators with Brewers, and Yankee’s with Cardinals, and you have a story that most Milwaukee fans can identify with because we, much like Joe, have seen our fair share of suffering over the years. It’s part of what being a small market fan means to me.

It means having the odds stacked against you:

From 1998 to 2012, Milwaukee played in the NL Central, the only division in all of baseball that was composed of 6 teams. So what, you say? Well, due to the fact that the division contained 1 more team than most (2 more than the AL West), Milwaukee’s chances of winning the division in any given year were a meager 16.67%. That’s 3.33% lower than most MLB teams.

It means being thankful for what you have:

When the Braves pulled up stakes and headed south to Atlanta, Milwaukee was left with a gaping hole where baseball had once resided. To their credit, the White Sox did try and remedy this to some extent by playing some games each year at County Stadium, but it just wasn’t the same as having a team to call our own. For this reason alone, I will always respect Bud Selig, not for being commission, but for returning baseball to a city that truly loves the game.

If you need further proof of this point, consider that Milwaukee ranked 11th in overall attendance last year despite being the team with the smallest market.

It means taking the highs with the lows:

My experiences at Miller Park have included being on hand the night that Milwaukee clinched the NL Central title for the first time and the day that they were officially eliminated from the 2012 playoff hunt. You learn to love the highs and accept the lows. It’s all part of loving the game.

It means staying true to your team, even when all hope is lost:

I ended the 2012 season by catching 3 out of the last 4 Brewers home games at Miller Park. Milwaukee was mathematically eliminated from the Wild Card hunt after losing the 1st of the 4 games, but I went to the remaining games anyway. Why? Because, you never know what you might see. In fact, for my troubles I got to see Martin Maldonado hit his first career grand slam, and Kameron Loe and Manny Parra pitch for the last time as Brewers.

Kevin Kimmes is a regular contributor to creamcitycables.com and an applicant for the 2013 MLB Fan Cave. You can follow him on Twitter at @kevinkimmes.